Silverman, Silverman & Seligman, P.C.
Every call gets taken by an attorney
CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION: 518-631-4521
Menu
The Benefits You Need Are Within Your Reach

New York worker injured in fall down elevator shaft

People often think of rescue workers being important following dangerous car accidents or medical emergencies. However, rescue workers are also often important after workplace accidents. Sometimes, whether rescue workers are called quickly enough can be the difference between life and death for injured workers. Police, firefighters and other first responders often have the skills and the technical knowledge to help people in dangerous situations.

In one recent New York rescue, a construction worker was working on an elevator shaft when a workplace accident occurred. According to reports, the worker -- believed to be in his 60s -- fell from the sixth story of the shaft. However, duct work on the fifth floor braced his fall and prevented him from falling all the way to the ground floor.

Firefighters were immediately called to the construction site. 30 firefighters worked together in a technical rescue using ropes and pulleys to get the man out of the elevator shaft safely. Following the man's rescue he was sent to a local hospital.

As a result of the rescue workers daring efforts, this worker suffered relatively minor workplace injuries. At this time, it is believed that he only broke his ankle -- and possibly his arm -- during the fall. Had the rescue workers not been successful, his injuries could have been much worse.

While this man only suffered broken bones, he is still likely to have expenses as a result of this workplace injury. By filing a workers' compensation claim, this man can be paid for any expenses that resulted from this injury including lost wages, medical costs and rehabilitation costs. This compensation can help this man provide for himself and his family until he is able to get back on both feet.

Source: Staten Island Advance, "FDNY rescues building worker from elevator shaft on Staten Island (photos)," Tracey Porpora, July 11, 2013